Chapter 2: The Tide of Death

The Poison Belt - The Strand Magazine, US edition, May 1913. Source: Project Gutenberg Australia

As we crossed the hall the telephone-bell rang, and we were the involuntary auditors of Professor Challenger’s end of the ensuing dialogue. I say “we,” but no one within a hundred yards could have failed to hear the booming of that monstrous voice, which reverberated through the house. His answers lingered in my mind. “Yes, […]

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Chapter 1: The Blurring of Lines

The Poison Belt - The Strand Magazine, US edition, May 1913. Source: Project Gutenberg Australia

It is imperative that now at once, while these stupendous events are still clear in my mind, I should set them down with that exactness of detail which time may blur. But even as I do so, I am overwhelmed by the wonder of the fact that it should be our little group of the […]

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The Poison Belt

The Poison Belt - The Strand Magazine, US edition, May 1913. Source: Project Gutenberg Australia

The Poison Belt was the second story, a novella, that Sir Arthur Conan Doyle wrote about Professor Challenger. Written in 1913, roughly a year before the outbreak of World War I, much of it takes place in a single room in Challenger’s house in Sussex – rather oddly, given that it follows The Lost World, […]

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The Adventure of the Retired Colourman

“I FELT A HAND INSIDE MY COLLAR.”

Sherlock Holmes was in a melancholy and philosophic mood that morning. His alert practical nature was subject to such reactions. “Did you see him?” he asked. “You mean the old fellow who has just gone out?” “Precisely.” “Yes, I met him at the door.” “What did you think of him?” “A pathetic, futile, broken creature.” […]

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The Adventure of Shoscombe Old Place

“I ALSO HAVE A QUESTION TO ASK YOU, SIR ROBERT,” HE SAID IN HIS STERNEST TONE.

Sherlock Holmes had been bending for a long time over a low-power microscope. Now he straightened himself up and looked round at me in triumph. “It is glue, Watson,” said he. “Unquestionably it is glue. Have a look at these scattered objects in the field!” I stooped to the eyepiece and focussed for my vision. […]

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The Adventure of the Veiled Lodger

“AS I SLIPPED THE BARS IT BOUNDED OUT, AND WAS ON ME IN AN INSTANT.”

When one considers that Mr. Sherlock Holmes was in active practice for twenty-three years, and that during seventeen of these I was allowed to cooperate with him and to keep notes of his doings, it will be clear that I have a mass of material at my command. The problem has always been not to […]

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The Adventure of the Lion’s Mane

I TURNED OVER THE PAPER. “THIS NEVER CAME BY POST. HOW DID YOU GET IT?”

It is a most singular thing that a problem which was certainly as abstruse and unusual as any which I have faced in my long professional career should have come to me after my retirement, and be brought, as it were, to my very door. It occurred after my withdrawal to my little Sussex home, […]

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The Adventure of the Creeping Man

THERE WAS A QUICK STEP ON THE STAIRS, A SHARP RAP AT THE DOOR, AND A MOMENT LATER THE NEW CLIENT PRESENTED HIMSELF.

Mr. Sherlock Holmes was always of opinion that I should publish the singular facts connected with Professor Presbury, if only to dispel once for all the ugly rumours which some twenty years ago agitated the university and were echoed in the learned societies of London. There were, however, certain obstacles in the way, and the […]

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The Problem of Thor Bridge

SUDDENLY HE SPRANG FROM HIS CHAIR.

Somewhere in the vaults of the bank of Cox and Co., at Charing Cross, there is a travel-worn and battered tin dispatchbox with my name, John H. Watson, M. D., Late Indian Army, painted upon the lid. It is crammed with papers, nearly all of which are records of cases to illustrate the curious problems […]

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The Adventure of the Three Garridebs

“WHY DID HE EVER DRAG YOU INTO IT AT ALL?” ASKED OUR VISITOR.

It may have been a comedy, or it may have been a tragedy. It cost one man his reason, it cost me a blood-letting, and it cost yet another man the penalties of the law. Yet there was certainly an element of comedy. Well, you shall judge for yourselves. I remember the date very well, […]

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